We have ended our 2020 shipping season and will be busy rebuilding the inventory (Growing Lots of Plants) over the coming months.
Our 2021 shipping season will begin in March. Feel free to order anytime and we will hold your order until Spring!!
Many Thanks to all our customers for such a busy busy year!
  • Echinacea purpurea or Purple Coneflower
  • Passionflower Passiflora incarnata
  • Evening Primrose "Ozark Sundrops"
  • Chinese Leopard Flower or Blackberry Lilly
  • Yellow Dotted Mint Monarda punctuata
  • Dandelion with a pollinator friend

Spring 2018 Newsletter

Crimson Sage Nursery Newsletter
Spring 2018


Is it getting too late to Plant??
Thoughts and tips on establishing your Medicinal plants

Springtime at the nursery is such a busy time. We are still starting seeds and potting seedlings trying to keep the inventory up all the while shipping many boxes of lovely plants carefully packed every Monday and Tuesday to destinations all over the country! I am often asked at this time of year as we transition into summer ‘is it too late to still plant some herbs?’  My answer is no, not at all; especially if you are careful about adjusting the new plants to your specific climate. And, it depends on where you live of course. Here are some site-specific hints about establishing herbs later in the growing season in the different regions of the country!

For folks living in the southern parts of California, the Desert Southwest, the Deep South and other areas already experiencing extreme heat, it can be challenging to establish young plants in 100 degree temperatures, but our plants are generally already well rooted so if done carefully it can work out fine. Start with a few days of acclimating them slowly to full sun and wind conditions. Then the transplanting should be done ideally in late evening. They need to be immediately on a drip line or some kind of deep irrigation (Hose watering in very hot climates is not always penetrating enough). Regular waterings throughout the season are necessary to insure survival.  The plants may have a bit of leaf burn initially from the extreme temperature switch but will most likely bounce back quickly if they receive regular watering and are kept weeded!  This would apply for many areas of inland California, Eastern Washington and Eastern Oregon.  For the hottest areas of the country with a milder winter climate such as the Desert Southwest, I highly suggest planting in the Fall season as that will give you the best success with establishing perennials in your climate.

For those of you living in the eastern part of the country in Hotter and humid climates, I find Summer transplanting to be surprisingly reasonable. The plants are coming to you from our climate here which has already hit the upper 80s with dry windy days at times. Temperatures in the 90’s are arriving later this week which is forcing the plants to toughen slowly by this time of year. When they land in a humid environment, that enables them to put energy into root establishment as there is less stress on the leaves in a humid /non -windy area. I still suggest acclimating them for a few days outdoors and then transplanting in the evening and regular watering in between summer rains to help their roots establish.  

For those of you living along the coastal west coast and Pacific Northwest which includes much of the Bay area, Seattle and Portland area where temperatures are lower due to coastal fog and moderated by the maritime influence, you have a much larger window to establish plants . With temperatures that peak in the 80’s and are mostly cooler, you can transplant and establish plants most of the season with out difficulty. Make sure the new plants get regular watering until more established.

For those of you living in the mountain west of Colorado, Utah, Montana, Wyoming and Idaho, we have been holding your orders till late May waiting for the most frost danger to pass. You can certainly establish plants well in your climate throughout the month of June. By July, the weather starts to get quite hot so you may have to follow more of the hot climate protocol for getting the plants acclimated. It certainly can still be successful, especially if your area is prone to summer thunderstorms . 

I hope this helps everyone to have success with establishing their plants after arrival and do bear in mind Medicinals in general are tough plants and are surprisingly resilient to a certain amount of neglect and extreme temperatures. I have seen plants completely leaf burned from a windy 105 degree day here get moved under a sprinkler and be lush and green again in a few weeks. .  Plants often regrow from their root system so do not give up on a plant too quickly you may be pleasantly surprised!

To inspire all of our wonderful customers for some later season planting, we are offering a nice discount on some of our favorite and easy to grow Medicinals!

Stinging Nettles  

Roman Chamomille

Calendula

Angelica

Priced at $6.25 each

For more detailed info on each plant follow the links below:

Crimson Sage Nursery 
Tina Glaessner, Herbalist 
PO Box 83 
Orleans, CA 95556 
Phone: 530-627-3065 
E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
https://www.crimson-sage.com/

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